The sharing of bicycles will inevitably cover most cities in the future. It will directly face hundreds of thousands of people, and it will need to operate under different climatic and geographical conditions for many years. It may also face unexpected situations and need to be practiced through long-term operations. Only then can we master the rules of the industry and the methods for stable operation. These all qualification required of the operators. For example, who is responsible for cleaning the bicycles after a sandstorm? Who is responsible for the slippery fall during a snow day? Who will maintain the display of bicycles during the Spring Festival or long holiday? Article 72 of the “Regulations on the Implementation of the Road Traffic Safety Law of the People’s Republic of China” stipulates that “bicycles and tricycles riding must be at least 12 years of age”. Based on the frequent cycling accidents involving children riding bicycles, how can a sharing bicycle company prevent such a violation? Who is responsible for the disinfection of a large-scale infectious disease? For technical startups, these social issues are not what they are good at thinking and dealing with. However, the most important consideration for transportation is personal safety. Any problem involving personal safety is definitely a problem. All rights and obligations must be separated, and once problems arise, they must be accountable.

From the perspective of avoiding financial risks, it is also very necessary to supervise. The deposit charged to the user by the shared bicycle is that the collateral is not a bicycle, but a bicycle in a certain period of time. Therefore, a large number of deposits were deposited in the shared bicycle company, but there was no corresponding complete collateral. What is more, start-up companies tend to focus on risk-taking and expansion. They have some deficiencies in corporate governance and risk avoidance. One immediate lesson is LeTV. How to manage these huge deposits should be regulated as soon as possible. From January to June this year, China’s investment in start-ups has been reduced by half from the same period of last year, and has dropped from RMB 167 billion last year to more than RMB 83 billion. There are also cases in which shared bicycles have been forced out of the market due to a broken capital chain. From the perspective of ensuring the security of deposits, the implementation of an access system is also a safe choice.

In the face of fierce competition, the current practice of sharing bicycle companies is to try to enter the upstream, monopolising the supply chain to form a barrier to competition. If the entire industry is monopolized by one or two companies at the end, it is very likely that there will be a monopoly pattern like the taxi market. Consumers can only let the monopoly abuse their monopoly status and arbitrarily raise prices.

If no access mechanism is established, and operators are not granted licenses to supervise their compliance operations, the consequences will be brutal deployment and disorderly competition. However, after the implementation of the access system, if the corresponding management regulations are not stipulated to constrain the operator’s operational efficiency, relying solely on the self-discipline of the enterprise and the social autonomy is a kind of ideological approach, and it will not fully improve the sharing of bicycles. Therefore, it should be a two-pronged approach. While implementing the access system and issuing operating licenses, relevant regulations are issued to define the scope of operators’ operations. The principle of formulating regulations should be to encourage people to use city road rights responsibly while leaving some room for innovation. The content of the regulations should include safety regulations, parking rules, operating rules, and maximum/minimum delivery volumes. Why do you have to specify the volume? Is this realistic? The answer is yes. It is entirely possible for various local governments to calculate the demand for their bicycles based on the number of permanent residents and the penetration rate.
From the perspective of avoiding financial risks, it is also very necessary to supervise. The deposit charged to the user by the shared bicycle is that the collateral is not a bicycle, but a bicycle in a certain period of time. Therefore, a large number of deposits were deposited in the shared bicycle company, but there was no corresponding complete collateral. What is more, start-up companies tend to focus on risk-taking and expansion. They have some deficiencies in corporate governance and risk avoidance. One immediate lesson is LeTV. How to manage these huge deposits should be regulated as soon as possible. From January to June this year, China’s investment in start-ups has been reduced by half from the same period of last year, and has dropped from RMB 167 billion last year to more than RMB 83 billion. There are also cases in which shared bicycles have been forced out of the market due to a broken capital chain. From the perspective of ensuring the security of deposits, the implementation of an access system is also a safe choice.


In the face of fierce competition, the current practice of sharing bicycle companies is to try to enter the upstream, monopolising the supply chain to form a barrier to competition. If the entire industry is monopolized by one or two companies at the end, it is very likely that there will be a monopoly pattern like the taxi market. Consumers can only let the monopoly abuse their monopoly status and arbitrarily raise prices.


If no access mechanism is established, and operators are not granted licenses to supervise their compliance operations, the consequences will be brutal deployment and disorderly competition. However, after the implementation of the access system, if the corresponding management regulations are not stipulated to constrain the operator’s operational efficiency, relying solely on the self-discipline of the enterprise and the social autonomy is a kind of ideological approach, and it will not fully improve the sharing of bicycles. Therefore, it should be a two-pronged approach. While implementing the access system and issuing operating licenses, relevant regulations are issued to define the scope of operators’ operations. The principle of formulating regulations should be to encourage people to use city road rights responsibly while leaving some room for innovation. The content of the regulations should include safety regulations, parking rules, operating rules, and maximum/minimum delivery volumes. Why do you have to specify the volume? Is this realistic? The answer is yes. It is entirely possible for various local governments to calculate the demand for their bicycles based on the number of permanent residents and the penetration rate.